Uploaded image for project: 'PUBLIC - Liferay Documentation'
  1. PUBLIC - Liferay Documentation
  2. LRDOCS-819

Revise Patching Liferay section of the Liferay Portal 6.1 User Guide

    Details

    • Type: New Article
    • Status: Closed
    • Priority: Minor
    • Resolution: Fixed
    • Fix Version/s: 6.1.X
    • Component/s: Core Infrastructure
    • Labels:
      None

      Description

      Please update the "Patching Liferay" section of the User Guide: http://www.liferay.com/documentation/liferay-portal/6.1/user-guide/-/ai/patching-liferay

      Add two paragraphs

      FROM

      Installing patches

      The absolute first thing you must do when installing one or more patches is to shut down your server. On Windows operating systems, files that are in use are locked by the OS, and won’t be patched. On LUM systems, you can generally replace files that are running, but of course that still leaves the old ones loaded in memory. So your best bet is to shut down the application server that’s running Liferay before you install a patch.

      Liferay distributes patches as .zip files, whether they are hot fixes or fix packs. When you receive one, either via a LESA ticket (hot fix) or through downloading a fix pack from the customer portal, you’ll need to place it in the patches folder, which is inside the patching tool’s home folder. Once you’ve done that, it’s a simple matter to install it. First, execute

      ./patching-tool.sh info

      This shows you a list of patches you’ve already installed, along with a list of patches that can be installed, from what’s in the patches folder. To install the available patches, issue the following command:

      ./patching-tool.sh install

      Your patches are now installed. You can verify this by using the ./patching-tool.sh info command, which now shows your patch in the list of installed patches. Let’s look now at how you’d manage your patches.

      TO

      Installing patches

      The absolute first thing you must do when installing one or more patches is to shut down your server. On Windows operating systems, files that are in use are locked by the OS, and won’t be patched. On LUM systems, you can generally replace files that are running, but of course that still leaves the old ones loaded in memory. So your best bet is to shut down the application server that’s running Liferay before you install a patch.

      Liferay distributes patches as .zip files, whether they are hot fixes or fix packs. When you receive one, either via a LESA ticket (hot fix) or through downloading a fix pack from the customer portal, you’ll need to place it in the patches folder, which is inside the patching tool’s home folder. Once you’ve done that, it’s a simple matter to install it. First, execute

      ./patching-tool.sh info

      This shows you a list of patches you’ve already installed, along with a list of patches that can be installed, from what’s in the patches folder. To install the available patches, issue the following command:

      ./patching-tool.sh install

      Liferay copies files into the plugins in deployment time. If these files are patched in the portal, they need to be updated in the plugins as well. In these cases, the patching-tool will notify you about the change. You can run the following command to update these files automatically:

      ./patching-tool.sh update-plugins

      If you do not wish to have the patching-tool update the plugins, redeployment of them is also enough. If there are new indexes created by the patch, the patching-tool will notify you to update them. To get the list, please run this command:

      ./patching-tool.sh index-info

      As there's no database connection at patching time, the patches needed to be created at portal startup. In order to get the indexes automatically created, please add the following line to the portal-ext.properties file if the server has permissions to modify the indexes on the database:

      database.indexes.update.on.startup=true

      Otherwise you will have to create the indexes manually. Check the index-info output for more details.

      Your patches are now installed. You can verify this by using the ./patching-tool.sh info command, which now shows your patches in the list of installed patches.

      Let’s look now at how you’d manage your patches.

        Attachments

          Activity

            People

            • Votes:
              0 Vote for this issue
              Watchers:
              0 Start watching this issue

              Dates

              • Due:
                Created:
                Updated:
                Resolved:

                Packages

                Version Package
                6.1.X